Jeanes (Janes), William[1]

Male Abt 1610 - 1690  (~ 80 years)


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  • Name Jeanes (Janes), William 
    • Abel identified William as his father in a deed. [2]
    • According to Savage, William always spelled his name Jeanes, but his descendants spelled it Janes. [3]
    Born Abt 1610  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • A reasonable and commonly used birth year, but undocumented.
    Gender Male 
    Relocation 1637-1639  New Haven, New Haven, Connecticutt Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5
    William was a shareholder in a London company of emigrants headed by a non-conformist minister the Rev. John Davenport and a well-to-do business man Theophilus Eaton. The company sailed from London on the Hector and an unidentified second ship in the spring of 1637 and arrived in Boston 24 Jun 1637. Having heard that a place called Quinnipiac might be a suitable location to settle, Eaton led an exploratory voyage in late summer to examine the site. Eaton found Quinnipiac to be preferable to any other location previously considered, and when he returned to Boston he left seven men behind to establish a presence there over the winter. The company returned to Quinnipiac in the spring of 1638 and began to establish the new colony. For the first year the colonists were engaged in practical foundation of the colony: laying out the town, building houses, planting crops, and making a treaty with the local Native Americans. On 4 Jun 1839, the free planters (stock holders) established their fundamental document. They voted that only church members would have voting rights (be freemen) and that the governmental affairs would be subject only to the word of God. There was no mention of English law, the crown or parliament. There also was a legal code but it has been lost. Osterweis argues that it was the "Cotton Code" which was based partly on biblical laws and was written by Rev. John Cotton for the Massachusetts Bay Colony but never implemented. In effect, the puritan colonists of Quinnipiac had set up a theocracy. The name of the Colony was changed to New Haven in 1640.  
    Property 1639-1648  New Haven, New Haven, Connecticutt Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7
    Shareholders received home lots. William's lot was at the corner of present day Chapel and Church Streets kitty corner to the market, now the New Haven Green. It is shown on a reproduction of the 1641 Brockett map of New Haven. He sold the property to John Meggs (Meges, Meigs), a tanner and currier (leather finisher), in 1648. Meggs was involved in two lawsuits over the poor quality of his leather and shoes made from it. The town gained ownership of the property in 1658, and Meggs moved to Guilford, Connecticut.  
    Relocation Abt 1655  Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 9
    William and his wife and all his children moved to Northampton. He was active in town affairs. On 13 Feb 1656 William was appointed Land Recorder, a position he held for many years. Later he was appointed schoolmaster for one year.  
    Property 1657 - 1664  Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    William received a home lot (2 acres) 5 Dec 1657 and several other parcels totaling about 34 acres. Parts or all of many of these were sold or traded for other land. He sold (alienated) small parcels of land to his children Ruth, Joseph and Ebenezer. He also donated 4 acres to a pool of land to be used by Mr. Mather, the town's clergyman, to attract new people to the town.  
    Relocation 1670-1675  Northfield, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    1669: A committee appointed by the Massachusetts General Court to layout a new plantation (Worcester) reported that two other places were also suitable for new towns. 1670: A party from Northampton, which included William Jeanes, examined one of the sites (called Squakheag, later Northfield) and found that the natives were willing to sell the tract. 1671: The members of the same party with others bought the tract from the natives. A group of 33 men, including William Jeanes and his sons Joseph and Abel, petitioned the General Court to purchase a plantation at Squakheag. Although the Deputies approved, the petition was denied by the Magistrates for unknown reasons. 1672: The petitioners tried again, and the settlement at Squakheag was approved. A committee was sent to Squakheag to lay out the township. 1673: Settlement began in the spring. Apparently few of the settlers built on their home lots, but instead put up closely spaced, thatch-covered huts (including one for worship) surrounded by a stockade. 1675: War with the Native Americans began in central Massachusetts on 2 Aug with an attack on Brookfield, perhaps 50 miles southeast of Squakheag. On 2 Sep the Native Americans attacked Squakheag and killed 8 including two of William Jeanes' sons Ebenezer and Jonathan (ages 16 & 14). On 4 Sep a rescue party from Hadly was attacked as it approached Squakheag and 21 more were killed. The settlers were finally rescued by a larger force and returned to their former homes in Northampton and Hadley. William Jeanes never returned to Northfield, but others did when Northfield was resettled in 1685.  
    Died 20 Sep 1690  Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Buried Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Hampshire,Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Person ID I2272  Martin-Bloom
    Last Modified 5 Jan 2019 

    Family 1 Mary,   b. England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Apr 1662, Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Janes, Joseph,   b. 1636, England? Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Feb 1694, Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     2. Janes, Elisha,   b. Abt 1639,   d. 11 Feb 1662, Springfield, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 23 years)
     3. Janes, Nathaniel,   b. Abt 1641, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1662, Springfield, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 21 years)
    +4. Janes, Abel,   b. Abt 1644, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Dec 1718, Lebanon, New London, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 74 years)
     5. Janes, Abigail,   b. Abt 1647, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location
    +6. Janes, Ruth,   b. 15 Feb 1650, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1672, Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
     7. Janes, Jacob,   b. Abt 1652, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Oct 1675  (Age ~ 23 years)
     8. Janes, William,   b. Abt 1654
     9. Janes, Rebecca,   b. Abt 1656
     10. Janes, Jeremiah,   b. Abt 1658,   d. 1675, Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 17 years)
     11. Janes, Ebenezer,   b. Abt 1659,   d. 2 Sep 1675, Northfield, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 16 years)
     12. Janes, Jonathan,   b. Abt 1661, Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Sep 1675, Northfield, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 14 years)
    Last Modified 14 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F797  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 (Bascom) Broughton, Hannah,   b. Abt 1630 
    Married 20 Nov 1662  Northampton, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Children 
     1. Janes, Samuel,   b. 9 Oct 1663
     2. Janes, Hepzibah,   b. 13 Feb 1665
     3. Janes, Hannah,   b. 5 Oct 1669
     4. Janes, Benjamin,   b. 30 Sep 1672
    Last Modified 22 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F807  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsRelocation - William was a shareholder in a London company of emigrants headed by a non-conformist minister the Rev. John Davenport and a well-to-do business man Theophilus Eaton. The company sailed from London on the Hector and an unidentified second ship in the spring of 1637 and arrived in Boston 24 Jun 1637. Having heard that a place called Quinnipiac might be a suitable location to settle, Eaton led an exploratory voyage in late summer to examine the site. Eaton found Quinnipiac to be preferable to any other location previously considered, and when he returned to Boston he left seven men behind to establish a presence there over the winter. The company returned to Quinnipiac in the spring of 1638 and began to establish the new colony. For the first year the colonists were engaged in practical foundation of the colony: laying out the town, building houses, planting crops, and making a treaty with the local Native Americans. On 4 Jun 1839, the free planters (stock holders) established their fundamental document. They voted that only church members would have voting rights (be freemen) and that the governmental affairs would be subject only to the word of God. There was no mention of English law, the crown or parliament. There also was a legal code but it has been lost. Osterweis argues that it was the "Cotton Code" which was based partly on biblical laws and was written by Rev. John Cotton for the Massachusetts Bay Colony but never implemented. In effect, the puritan colonists of Quinnipiac had set up a theocracy. The name of the Colony was changed to New Haven in 1640. - 1637-1639 - New Haven, New Haven, Connecticutt Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsProperty - Shareholders received home lots. William's lot was at the corner of present day Chapel and Church Streets kitty corner to the market, now the New Haven Green. It is shown on a reproduction of the 1641 Brockett map of New Haven. He sold the property to John Meggs (Meges, Meigs), a tanner and currier (leather finisher), in 1648. Meggs was involved in two lawsuits over the poor quality of his leather and shoes made from it. The town gained ownership of the property in 1658, and Meggs moved to Guilford, Connecticut. - 1639-1648 - New Haven, New Haven, Connecticutt Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsRelocation - William and his wife and all his children moved to Northampton. He was active in town affairs. On 13 Feb 1656 William was appointed Land Recorder, a position he held for many years. Later he was appointed schoolmaster for one year. - Abt 1655 - Northampton, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Nov 1662 - Northampton, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsProperty - William received a home lot (2 acres) 5 Dec 1657 and several other parcels totaling about 34 acres. Parts or all of many of these were sold or traded for other land. He sold (alienated) small parcels of land to his children Ruth, Joseph and Ebenezer. He also donated 4 acres to a pool of land to be used by Mr. Mather, the town's clergyman, to attract new people to the town. - 1657 - 1664 - Northampton, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 20 Sep 1690 - Northampton, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S278] The Janes Family, Frederic Janes, (John H. Dingman, New York, 1868), 929.2 J33., pp. 31-79.

    2. [S164] Deed, Hampden County, Massachusetts, Book H, p. 2, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9ZH-P3F6?cc=2106411&wc=MCBL-M68%3A361612401%2C361661001.
      Although Northampton is in Hampshire County, the deed is located with Hampden County deeds on familysearch.org.

    3. [S279] A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, James Savage, (Little Brown and Co., Boston, 1860), Vol. 2, p. 538.

    4. [S282] Three Centuries of New Haven, 1638-1938, Rollin G. Osterweis, (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1953), 974.68 N543o., pp. 5-21.

    5. [S283] Records of the Colony and Plantation of New Haven, Charles J. Hoadley, (Case Tiffany and Co, 1857), 974.67 N532., Vol 1., pp. 11-18.

    6. [S280] Papers of the New Haven Colony Historical Society, (New Haven Colony Historical Society), 974.67 N54., Vol 1. pp. 29-45, History of the Cutler Lot by Henry White.

    7. [S281] The Case of the Piglet's Paternity, Jon C. Blue, (Wesleyan University Press, Middletown, CT, 2015), p. 84, The Faulty Shoes.

    8. [S271] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, (Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), Northampton Proprietors records, 13 Feb 1656, image 9 of 372.

    9. [S284] History of Northampton, Massachusetts, James Russell Trumbull, (Gazette Printing Co., Northampton, 1898), 974.42 N862., Vol. 1, pp. 6, 18, 32, 35, 54, 81, 94, 125.

    10. [S271] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, (Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), Northampton Proprietors records images 11,12,24,25 of 372.

    11. [S286] History of the Town of Northfield, Massachusetts, J. H. Temple and George Sheldon, (Joel Munsell, Albany, N.Y., 1875), 974.42 N872 ., pp. 50-53, 59-93.

    12. [S271] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, (Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), Northampton death record, p.139 images 515 and 662 of 2680.

    13. [S202] findagrave.com, Memorial # 77841817.

    14. [S271] Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, (Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011), Northampton marriages, p. 100, image 643 of 2680.